Category: Gear Reviews

Nikon D3400

Best DSLR Cameras Under $500! The Winners are… [Comparison]

    Many aspiring photographers look at the price of a new DSLR with all the bells and whistles, and quickly decide this hobby is much too expensive to begin. The large amounts of technical sounding terms, additional equipment, and skill needed can be very intimidating. This article will detail some of the best DSLRs available to get anyone on a budget started in the photography world quickly and easily.

Sony a6000

Sony a6000: The Best-Selling Mirrorless Camera of All Time [Review]

With a price of  with kit lens, the Sony a6000 is considered one of the best entry-level mirrorless cameras on the market. Mirrorless technology is still relatively new compared to the more familiar DSLRs that have been dominant for decades. In addition, the selection of bodies and lenses is noticeably smaller for the mirrorless line, but this is changing rapidly. The popularity of the a6000 silver brings into question the value, image quality, and ease of use for the average user looking to transition to the newer technology. Explore the Sony a6000 with Digital Camera Central below.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II: Are the Features Worth the Price? [Review]

  With a price of , the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II is a powerful new addition to the growing line of mirrorless cameras. These cameras are the first major break from the dominant DSLR line of professional grade digital cameras in years and the new system brings powerful new options to the photography world. Is the OMD EM1 Mark II worth the price and learning curve for those new to mirrorless cameras? We’ll help you determine the answer to that question in this review.

Manfrotto BeFree Tripod

Why the Manfrotto BeFree Tripod is the Right Tripod for You [Review]

Typical uses for a tripod revolve around achieving a crisp image when your camera’s settings require a longer exposure.  For example, let’s say you want to use a low ISO setting when photographing a static object, and additionally a tight aperture for a fuller depth of field. In that case, unless you have studio lighting with strobes or continuous lamps, you have to employ a tripod. Simply put you can’t hold a camera still enough for a sharp image and a long exposure. The blurring may be apparent, or only show up after reviewing images on a computer, but it’s going to be there.