Category: Crash Course

Photography Crash Course

Beginner’s Digital Photography Crash Course: Choosing Your Equipment

  The technical specifications of your camera often sound very impressive. On the camera box, you’ll see words like “20 megapixels on a high quality CMOS sensor.” Or “powerful VR II lens included.” Sorting through all of the jargon to understand exactly what you’re buying, might be difficult for those new to photography. How do you know if you even need all of your camera’s features? If you have a user manual, now’s a good time to open it. Then turn to the tech specs section and make sure you understand exactly what your camera can do. Or if you’re in the market for one, continue on to ensure you’re making an informed decision.

Photography Crash Course

Beginner’s Digital Photography Crash Course: Exposure and Composition

  Exposure and composition are the foundations for creating great photos. If you don’t understand these concepts, you will never be able to take your camera out of auto mode. Images are created when light hits a camera sensor. Controlling the amount of light and how it hits the sensor is the most important thing to master.

Photography Crash Course

Beginner’s Digital Photography Crash Course: Types of Photography

  While photography is essentially capturing an image of a subject using a camera, there are several types worth considering. The types discussed here are what most people think of when asked about photography. Therefore, they are general overviews of how you can classify photos. A macro photo can also be a wildlife photo and a portrait. A landscape can also be black and white, or a night photo. There are also many other “subcategories,” such as architecture or fashion photography. Fashion photography is related to portraiture in most ways, but also has some differences. So use these as rough guidelines to consider what style you prefer and what gear is needed.

Photography Crash Course

Beginner’s Digital Photography Crash Course: Introduction

  Photography is an art form nearly 200 years old. The very first photograph that we know of was taken by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in France around 1826. Titled “View from the Window at Le Gras,” it was created by coating a pewter plate with natural asphalt. Over an eight hour exposure, the parts exposed to bright light hardened. The dimly lit portions of the photo-to-be could be washed away with a chemical solution. And the result was an early photograph. We’ve come from this impressive, if inelegant, design to having pocket-sized devices capable of taking dozens of detailed, color images per second.